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Participating Congregations and Organizations
  • American Muslim Voice
  • Bahá'í Community of Palo Alto
  • Beyt Tikkun Synagogue
  • First Baptist Church Palo Alto
  • First Congregational Church (United Church of Christ) Palo Alto
  • First Evangelical Lutheran Church Palo Alto
  • First Presbyterian Church Palo Alto
  • First United Methodist Church Palo Alto
  • Network of Spiritual Progressives
  • Palo Alto Friends Meeting
  • St. Thomas Aquinas Parish, Palo Alto (Catholic)
  • Social Action Committee of the Redwood City Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship
  • Trinity Church in Menlo Park (Episcopal)
  • Unitarian Universalist Church of Palo Alto
  • Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Los Gatos
  • West Bay Chapter, Buddhist Peace Fellowship

Who's Online
Guest Users: 10

Campaign Nonviolence National Conference Aug 6-8 Online

Campaign Nonviolence National Conference
Embracing the Nonviolence Shift
Marking the 75th Anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

August 6: Online Vigil for Hiroshima and Nagasaki
(5pm PDT)
August 7: Online Nonviolence Training
(12Noon PDT)
August 8: Online Conference
(9am PDT)

CLICK HERE for full 3 day schedule and list of speakers.

Experience the wisdom of nonviolence visionaries, scholars and practitioners
Hear of concrete pathways to build a transformed world -- a world free of racism, poverty, war and environmental crisis.
In this time of great transition ushered in by a worldwide crisis, nonviolence offers us what we need right now: vision, strategies and practices that will equip us to live and lead in the direction of personal and societal transformation.

Featured speakers include Dr. Ira Helford, MD (Steering Committee of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) which was the recipient of the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize), Roshi Joan Halifax (Upaya Zen Center), Rev. Lennox Yearwood, Jr. (minister, activist, President and CEO of the Hip Hop Caucus), Rev. Richard Rohr (Center for Action and Contemplation, theologian, religious leader, author, Franciscan priest), Dr. Erica Chenowith (Harvard University, social scientist and scholar on nonviolence), and many others. Click here for full list of speakers. 

Registration Information:
August 6 Vigil - Free but registration required
August 7 Nonviolence Training - $20
August 8 Conference - $50
Student discounts 50% and other scholarships available.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER.

 


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Menlo Park Mayor Signs the 'Back from the Brink' Resolution

On May 26, 2020, with the encouragement of Multifaith Voices for Peace & Justice working with Menlo Park peace activist Judy Adams, Cecelia Taylor, the mayor of Menlo Park, signed a proclamation supporting a call for the federal government to take five specific steps to reduce the risk of nuclear war.

Entitled "Back from the Brink," this call was created by the Union of Concerned Scientists and Physicians for Social Responsibility, and has been endorsed by 250 organizations including the California State Legislature. Menlo Park joins Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and Santa Monica to become the seventh California city to endorse 'The Call.'

Click here to read Op-Ed (July 31, 2020 in The Almanac) "Stepping Back from the Brink: Steps to reduce the risk of nuclear war" written by Richard Duda (of MVPJ) and Judy Adams about the call and Menlo Park action. If you are moved, write a comment online to raise awareness!

Click here to download a PDF of the official, signed Proclamation.
The full text of the mayor's Back from the Brink Proclamation is below.


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Multifaith Prayers for Peace on 11th of the Month

Monthly Multifaith Prayers for Peace
7-7:30pm on 11th of every month

NEXT GATHERING:
Tuesday, August 11, 7-7:30pm - hosted by First Presbyterian Church of Palo Alto. Join together via ZOOM. Zoom link will be sent out to MVPJ email list the morning of the event. To join our email list enter your address in the top right corner box on this website and follow the instructions. If you did not receive the link to join our Peaceful Presence, please email diana@multifaithpeace.org the morning of the event and she will send it to you.

In the midst of difficult times, Multifaith Voices for Peace and Justice will host “Peaceful Presence,” a monthly prayer service on the evening of the 11th of each month, offering a time of quiet multifaith prayers for peace and strength for the journey.  All are welcome: those of all faith traditions and of no defined faith, those who are suffering at the hands of their own government, those who need a pause in the midst of intensive work on behalf of others, and all who would like to pray with others for the well-being of all.  The prayer time will include elements from several religious traditions.

Upcoming
Tuesday, August 11, 7-7:30pm - hosted by First Presbyterian Church of Palo Alto
Friday, Sepember 11, 5:30-7:30pm - hosted by American Muslim Voice
Sunday, October 11, 7-7:30pm - hosted by Congregation Beth Am
Wednesday, November 11, 7-7:30pm - hosted by First Congregational Church of Palo Alto
Friday, December 11, 7-7:30pm - hosted by First Church of Christ, Scientist


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June 11 Peaceful Presence on Racial Justice

Peaceful Presence: Multifaith Prayers for Peace and Strength for the Journey
June 11, 2020

This powerful gathering was hosted by the MVPA Musalla, a Mountain View/Palo Alto Muslim Community, and led by Farha Andrabi Navaid, leader of the Musalla. The focus was on the pressing need for racial justice. Contributions included:

"Peace and Struggle" remarks by Rev. Amy Morgenstern and inspired by Frederick Douglas. Click here to download and read.

"Hearts of Stones" remarks were shared by Quaker Eric Sabelman from Palo Alto Friends Meeting. Click here to download and read.

Jewish Reading from Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel and Song - presented by Rabbi Amy Eilberg. Click here to download and read.

A Christian prayer led by Rev. Dr. Diana Gibson and inspired by Pope Paul VI, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, and the Poor People's Campaign. Click here to download and read.

A song in memory of Chris Lundin, our beloved MVPJ Steering committee member, "music director," colleague and friend. (Click here to see our memory page for Chris.) "This is my song, O God of all the nations" was sung by Chris French from the Baha'i community. This was one of Chris Lundin's favorite songs. 


The following closing prayer with times of silence after each line was led by Kareem Syed of the MVPA Musalla:
Prayer for the family of George Floyd, and all those killed by violence.
Prayer for the healing of our own wounds from violence.
Prayer for the healing of the scourge of racism.
Prayer for the healing of our country.
Prayer in the face of fear.
Prayer for returning to God and holy ways.
Prayer for people to get to work and inspiration and courage to make a difference.


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Pastor Calls for Change in Palo Alto

"Our country continues to contend with the horrific killing of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery. Across the country, people are exercising their right to protest against these injustices. As a country and a city, we must face the reality that we have systemic issues that disproportionately affect black people and that need to be addressed now," writes Rev. Kaloma A. Smith, pastor of University A.M.E. Zion Church and chair of the Human Relations Commission. (Click here to read the full Guest Opinion piece on Palo Alto Online.)

Rev. Smith's call for change was presented at the Palo Alto City Council Meeting on Monday, June 8. Click here to read the Palo Alto online June 9th article about that meeting.

All of us are asked to pray for our country, our cities, for change and for jusice. AND we are called to act. You can support changes in Palo Alto right now by doing these few simple things:

  • Email your city mayor, city manager, and council members in support of police reform!
  • Make public comments on community forums supporting calls for racial justice and BLM. Insist on the dignity and worth of black lives and all people of color. Lift up the need for change right here! Keep the conversation going.
  • Visit the #8cantwait website to learn about the campaign to make these 8 life-saving policies part of all police departments. Scroll down to find out  what policies your local police department has in place, and what need to be added. (If you city is not listed there, do the research yourself.) NOW start a campaign to make ALL OF 8 CAN'T WAIT POLICIES STANDARD PRACTICE IN YOUR LOCAL POLICE DEPARTMENT.

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Calls to Action: Advocacy and Prayers Online, House Signs, On the Streets, and More

Week of Action - Month of Action - Life of Action:
Speak - Act - Pray to End Racist Violence and Build Racial Justice

Many of us are unsure how to most faithfully protest the egregious atrocities of violence against our black siblings and how to stand up and take action for justice in this tumultuous time. As each of us discerns what we are called to do, let us turn to the best in our own faith tradition that inspires us to be most loving and courageous. Let us learn from others - those in other faith traditions and leaders from the past. And let us remember, and commit, that we are in this struggle for the long haul.

What we do know is this: A time comes when silence is betrayal, and that time has come for us.

Overview of Possibilities
(This is meant to prompt your own imagination!
Send us your ideas to share!)

Online: Join or watch vigils; participate in training and education; advocate via social media; gather virtually for prayer and discernment; write emails to people in power; make donations; stay informed; watch movies and documentaries that help broaden your awareness.
From your Home: Post signs in your yard or own your car; send letters (yes, using the U.S. Mail Service!); call people in power; reach out to neighbors, friends, family and strangers; make sure people of color know they are not alone; educate yourself about how to shop, bank, etc. without supporting white supremacy; read relevant books.
On the Streets: Join peaceful and safe protests if you feel called to do so; work with others on creative and safe ways to publicly show solidarity -- then invite others and do it!


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Chris Lundin: Presente!

Chris Lundin: In Loving Memory

With deep sadness we share the news that Chris Lundin, longtime member of the MVPJ Steering Committee, loyal songleader, passionate and faithful advocate for peace and justice, and incredible friend and colleague, died on Jun 4, 2020. 

Many of you will recognize the pictures of Chris leading songs with his guitar at MVPJ events, which he has done wonderfully and regularly ever since 2003 when his father, Walt Lundin, asked him to provide music for our 24-hour vigil in front of Palo Alto City Hall on the weekend before the U.S. attacked Iraq. (Walt Lundin was a founding member of MVPJ.) On countless occasions in the past 17 years, Chris' gentle spirit and gift of music invited us all to participate, and enriched almost every gathering we have had. 

Shortly after the 2003 event, Chris "inherited" his father's role on our MVPJ Steering Committee. He has been our primary liaison with St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Parish. Chris' commitment to peace strengthened our relationship with the Roman Catholic community both locally and beyond.


But Chris was so much more than a musician and a liaison, he was a wise leader, insightful colleague, and incredible friend to us all. His warm, inclusive presence was a gift to everyone. His humor was a delight when our work seemed so heavy. His patience and dedication unparalleled. His vibrant and energetic spirit led one MVPJ member comment that he seemed eternally young. His passion and commitment for justice and peace urged us to move forward with bolder and more faithful words and actions.

In rain or shine (we couldn't find pictures of him with umbrellas, but we have the memories), at dawn, dusk or high noon, on Lytton Plaza or King Plaza or marching on University Ave., in churches, synagogues and mosques, at trainings, teach-ins, protests and vigils, and tenaciously at almost every planning and organizing meeting, Chris was always with us.

At Chris' Memorial Mass, Fr. Matthew Stanley shared this quote from John Denver that fits Chris, and the gifts he gave us, so well.
"Muslic does bring people together. It allows us to experience the same emotions. People everywhere are the same in heart and spirit. No matter what language we speak, what color we are, the form of our politics or the expression of our love and our faith, music proves: We are the same." 


We express our sincere sympathy to Chris's whole family, and to his church community of St. Thomas Aquinas.

We lift up prayers of profound gratitude for the gift of his presence among us for so many years.

We commit to keep his spirit alive not only in our hearts, but in our continued work, so terribly needed, for justice and peace.

We will all miss him dearly.


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"All Black Beings are Buddhas from the Beginning"

In the midst of the moral and humanitarian crisis we are facing in our nation, this image from the Buddhist Peace Fellowship reminds us of our common humanity. The Buddhist Peace Fellowship acknowledges the depth of the struggle for justice, stating, "We know that the karma of slavery, policing, and anti-Blackness is unbearably heavy in this country. And it is our responsibility to burn through this karma with clarity, compassion and willingness to act."  

"Racism is a virus. It infects the spirit." (The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III)

Words and actions from other faith traditions:

The United Church of Christ minister Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, III's riveting and challenging sermon, "The Cross and the Lynching Tree: A Requiem for Ahmaud Arbery" was preached Sunday, May 17, 2020. While the sermon was delivered before the killing of George Floyd, the critical need for his words is even more apparent now. On Sunday, May 31, Rev. Moss offered another sermon, "When Is Someday?" suggested as a prelude to the May 17 sermon. Both carry messages we as a nation and as people of faith need to hear.

"As people of faith, we must bear witness to this moment. That means that we must name hard truths, but we must also act," states the first line of the pledge the Unitarian Universalist Association is inviting their members to sign. It continues with a reminder of the words of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. "America must see that riots do not develop out of thin air. Certain conditions continue to exist in our society which must be condemned as vigorouly as we condemn the riots. But in the final analysis, a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it that America has failed to hear?" See full statement, suggested organizations to support, and pledge here.

"The brutal murder of George Floyd is the consequence of a racist system that disproportionally targets people of color for violence, imprisonment, and premature death," said Shanene Herbert, American Friends Service Committee's (Quaker) director of the Healing Justice program in Saint Paul, Minn. Read the full statement here.

The organization T'ruah: the rabbinic call for human rights lifts up the Jewish teaching that, "one who sheds blood is considered as having diminished the divine image." "We say once again: Black Lives Matter. And we commit to creating a country that lives by this statement." Read their full "Statement on the Murder of George Floyd and Violence against Protesters."

"As an organization which advocates for the needs of the most marginalized, we do what our Prophet Mohammad (peace be upon him) taught us: to firmly confront what is hateful and destructive to life, love and community. Our faith is incompatible with systems of racial hierarchy. We are taught to always promote justice, work to end suffering, and seek abolition of that which is cruel and unjust," states "A Letter of Solidarity in Support of Black Rage" from CAIR (Council on American Islamic Relations) San Francisco Bay Area. Read full statement with concrete suggestions for actions here.

The National Council of Churches' statement acknowledges, "Deplorably, while the coronavirus has infected the U.S. and been the cause of death for more than 101,000 people in less than three months, racism has infected this country since its beginning and this virus has seeped into every aspect of American life."

The Christian Science Daily Lift program offers this perspective in a 4 minute podcast by Trudy Palmer, "Our part in responding to injustice."


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Honor Lives Lost Every Sunday 8-9pm

#HonorLivesLost
Online Weekly Candle-lighting Ritual
To #FreeThemAll

Every Sunday, 8-9pm PST

#HonorLivesLost is a network of organizers and advocates dedicated to memorializing and uplifting incarcerated people we lose to COVID-19 & #DeathByIncarceration in CA.

Click here to visit their Facebook page for more information.


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MLK: "A riot is the language of the unheard."

"Let me say, as I've always said and I will continue to say, that riots are socially destructive and self-defeating. ... But in the final analysis, a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it that America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the Negro poor has worsened over the last few years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice, equality and humanity."
-- Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., "The Other America"

Click here to for youtube video of King delivering this excerpt of his speech.


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Events
Quote of the Month

“Do not get lost in a sea of despair. Be hopeful, be optimistic. Our struggle is not the struggle of a day, a week, a month, or a year. It is the struggle of a lifetime. Never, ever be afraid to make some noise and get in good trouble, necessary trouble. "

…Congressman John Lewis